Archive

August 2017
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Outstanding new collection acquired by Library is a U.S. ‘national treasure’

The United States Capitol, the home of Congress, in the 1840s.

The Library is delighted to announce the acquisition of two prestigious primary sources from Readex which combined provide comprehensive, digitised access to documents on people, issues and events in American history, politics, law and culture since 1817.

Often described as a “national treasure” the United States . . . → Read More: Outstanding new collection acquired by Library is a U.S. ‘national treasure’

What’s on: 5 days to mark on your calendar

It’s a busy time of semester. It is exactly why it’s a good time to take a break from studying or working. Take an hour away from all that and come to Matheson Library for a dose of stimulating conversations with authors.

Don’t miss the chance to attend one, two or all of the Turning the page . . . → Read More: What’s on: 5 days to mark on your calendar

Heritage as soft power: Recent publishing on Tibetan antiquities in China and its uses

Recently acquired items at the Asian Studies Research Collection, Matheson Library

Join this Asian Studies Research Collection seminar to learn about the importance of materials being acquired in the Chinese and Tibetan languages and in the fields of Asian art, history and Buddhist studies.

The guest speaker will be Iain Sinclair, a PhD candidate with the School of . . . → Read More: Heritage as soft power: Recent publishing on Tibetan antiquities in China and its uses

Nineteenth-century research now easier

A new online resource is available to assist Monash researchers who are trying to discover which books or other primary source materials were available in the nineteenth century and before the end of the First World War.

The Nineteenth-Century Short title Catalogue (NSTC) aims to define the printed record of the English-speaking world from 1801 and 1919. . . . → Read More: Nineteenth-century research now easier

Books never die – exhibition opens

Transit of venus cover (1874)

A new exhibition opened recently at the Matheson Library declaring boldly that Books never die.

The exhibition celebrates the history of the book over six centuries, and includes examples of printing from famous presses of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and of illustration types, typefaces and binding used at different times.

Australian publications are a feature of . . . → Read More: Books never die – exhibition opens