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Congratulations to Kai Siong Yow

September 13th, 2018 by David Wood

Congratulations to Kai Siong Yow, who submitted his PhD thesis on 11th September. The title of the thesis is Tutte-Whitney polynomials for directed graphs and maps. Main supervisor was Graham Farr, associate supervisor was Kerri Morgan.

Doctor Darcy

June 23rd, 2018 by iwanless

Great work by Darcy Best, whose PhD thesis “Transversal This, Transversal That” was officially ratified by the powers-that-be on June 20. So he is now a dinky-di doctor of philosophy. If you have any philosophical ailments, book an appointment. I’m sure his fees are reasonable.

Congratulations Darcy Best

March 29th, 2018 by iwanless

Hearty congratulations to Darcy Best who submitted his PhD thesis on 28 Mar. His thesis is on transversals of Latin squares and related objects, (supervised by Ian Wanless)

Daniel Horsley wins Hall medal

March 11th, 2018 by iwanless

Hearty congratulations to Daniel Horsley, who has been awarded the 2017 Hall medal by the Institute of Combinatorics and its Applications.

The Hall medal recognizes extensive quality research with substantial international impact by Fellows of the ICA in mid-career. Information about the ICA medals can be found at: http://luca-giuzzi.unibs.it/ICA/medals.php

Wanless on the box

February 28th, 2018 by David Wood

Ian Wanless’ television career is burgeoning. Tonight he is in action on The Chase.

Harald Bögeholz wins inaugural Anne Penfold Street Prize

December 9th, 2017 by iwanless

Monash PhD student Harald Bögeholz won the inaugural Anne Penfold Street Student Prize, for the best student talk at the conference 5ICC.

Harald’s presentation was entitled “Calculating Connected Components in Huge Graphs by Randomised Contraction”. Warm congratulations to Harald.

 

5th International Combinatorics Conference a big success

December 9th, 2017 by iwanless

Monash hosted the 5th International Combinatorics Conference from 3-9 December 2017. It was attended by 163 mathematicians and students from Australia, Canada, China, Croatia, Czechia, Germany, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Japan, Malta, New Zealand, Singapore, Slovenia, South Africa, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Thailand, United Kingdom, United States and Vietnam (fully justifying the name of the conference!). There were 124 talks, 2 excursions, a public lecture and a memorable dinner.

Invited Speaker at the ICM

November 24th, 2017 by David Wood

Congratulations to Nick Wormald who will be an invited speaker in the Combinatorics section of the 2018 International Congress of Mathematicians.

ARC Grant Success

November 10th, 2017 by David Wood

In today’s ARC grant announcements, Nick Wormald and Anita Liebenau received a Discovery Project. Congratulations Nick and Anita!

Bill Tutte Centenary Celebration

September 25th, 2017 by David Wood

Today we celebrated the Bill Tutte Centenary Year with a half-day event consisting of the following short talks about his life, work, and influence on mathematics:

Graham Farr: Overview of Tutte’s life
Kerri Morgan: Squaring the square
Ron Steinfeld / Amin Sakzad: Tutte’s work at Bletchley Park in WW2
Kai Siong Yow: The dissection of equilateral triangles into equilateral triangles
Graham Farr: A ring in graph theory
Ranjie Mo: A contribution to the theory of chromatic polynomials
Jane Gao: When can vertices be all paired up?
Sanming Zhou (Melb): A family of cubical graphs
David Wood: How Tutte would draw a graph
Grant Cairns (La Trobe): The Hanani-Tutte Theorem
Norman Do: Tutte’s topological recursion
Daniel Mathews: The Tutte polynomial and knot theory
Andrew Elvey Price (Melb): Some counting problems on planar maps
Nick Wormald: My impressions of Tutte

William (Bill) Tutte (1917-2002) became a research mathematician while still an undergraduate at Cambridge in the late 1930s, broke the toughest Nazi codes while at Bletchley Park in WW2, and became one of the greatest mathematicians of the 20th century. His work saved countless lives during the war and led the development of graph theory. His work was usually inspired by pure curiosity or recreational puzzles, but has been applied in domains as diverse as electrical circuits, statistical physics and information visualisation.